Country Lips' "Till The Daylight Comes"

Country Lips' "Till The Daylight Comes"

By Shane Moyer

What I love about music is the endless possibilities. I chose to review a country music album because I am not necessarily familiar with the genre and wanted to experience something new.  Country Lips’ Till the Daylight Comes did an awesome job of exposing me to new excitement. This album has everything expected of a country and western musical experience: the misfit jaunt through a rough and rowdy honky-tonk, which personifies a sub-culture with deep-rooted blues and a thick progressive bluegrass overlay.

The album starts deep in the back woods of a hill town Laundromat. This harmony courts us in a gentle country manor with its guitar and ivories back and forth. As we have decided already that this band is allowed to date our newly excited psyche, the next track reminds us of what it was like to have been naughty and to have lost. “Grizzly Bear Billboard” paints a wonderful picture of a hometown with a careless and sexual jaunt, and warns us that it almost always ends. And with that, I am subtly reminded of the "one who got away". 

In perfect timing, track three is a drinking song, aptly titled “Reason I'm Drinking.” The wonderful abilities of these musicians really start to shine through for me and unmistakably help tell the reason for inebriation. As always - at least for me - drinking leads to sorrow and regret, and what country album is complete without these emotions?  “Only Here Long Enough to Leave” leaves us with that bittersweet symphony of melancholy. The guitar illustrates the expressed feelings the best while the accompany backs up its woes.

So far whilst listening to Till the Daylight Comes, we have dated, slept together, lost, drank, and said our goodbyes. Naturally, the only thing left is to complain. “Bar Time” does just that. Regardless of where we reside in this great country, we have all experienced a night where we wished it wouldn't end. The mouth harp’s playful syncopation really catches the ear and helps us empathize with the story. The next two songs on the album, “Day in the Sun” and “Friday's My Friday,” express hardworking and hard playing. The lead guitar really sells the frustration from this life balance.

The back end of this album is just as warm and bright as the front end with a few love songs. “Holding Out” makes you want to dance the two-step and punch someone at the same time, but my favorite track off this album is “Autograph”. The swing, the baritone vocals, the piano/guitar game of catch; all of it embodies everything country.

Till the Daylight Comes has set a perfect tone to showcase Progressive Bluegrass and I am left delighted. All the way through this album there is a masterful illustration; a story of love and loss; of work and play; of drinking, dancing, and fighting; and while listening I want to go do all these things. I cannot wait until Country Lips comes to my town and I can experience the album live.

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